.220 Swift vs .225 Winchester
GunCritic

.220 Swift VS .225 Winchester

Head to Head Comparison

.220 Swift

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50%

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50%

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.225 Winchester

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50%

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0 Reviews

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50%

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0 Reviews

MSRP:

$25.99

Used Price:

$20.79

New Price:

$25.99

MSRP:

$0.00

Used Price:

$0.00

New Price:

$0

Gun Specifications

Specifications

.220 Swift

.225 Winchester

Height

2.21

1.93

Average FPS

3846

3570

Average Grain

51

55

Average Energy

1674

1556

Recoil

0.90

0.90

Ballistic Coefficient

221.00

208.00

Gun Stats

Recently Deals

.220 Swift

Sportsman's Warehouse

$0.00

Palmetto State Armory

$0.00

MidwayUSA

$25.99

Guns.com

$0.00

Cheaper Than Dirt

$59.89

Academy Sports + Outdoors

$0.00

Guns.com

$0.00

Brownells

$0.00

GrabAGun

$50.09

Bereli

$0.00

Brownells.com

$0.00

EuroOptic.com

$0.00

KYGUNCO

$0.00

Primary Arms

$0.00

Sportsman's Guide

$0.00

Cabela's

$0.00

Bass Pro Shops

$0.00

Firearms Depot

$0.00

.225 Winchester

Sportsman's Warehouse

$0.00

Palmetto State Armory

$0.00

Guns.com

$0.00

Cheaper Than Dirt

$0.00

Academy Sports + Outdoors

$0.00

Guns.com

$0.00

Brownells

$0.00

GrabAGun

$49.99

Firearms Depot

$0.00

Bereli

$0.00

Bass Pro Shops

$0.00

Cabela's

$0.00

Sportsman's Guide

$0.00

Primary Arms

$0.00

KYGUNCO

$0.00

EuroOptic.com

$0.00

Brownells.com

$0.00

Gun Descriptions

220 Swift Ammo The 220 Swift Ammo remains the fastest production cartridge ever made. It dates back to 1935 when Winchester introduced it into their model 54 bolt action rifle. The original inspiration of the 220 Swift Ammo came from Grosvenor Wotkyns, who wanted to neck down the 250-3000 Savage case. However, Winchester necked it down to .22 caliber and loaded it with a 48-grain bullet with a muzzle velocity of 4110 fps. The 220 Swift Ammo uses .224 bullets despite its name and continues to be the most accurate high-power .22 cartridge created. Like other high-velocity cartridges, it usually has erratic performance on larger specimens unless you utilize bullets constructed for this purpose. The .220 Swift Ammo shoots flatter than other ammo at 325 yards. It is also known to deliver 725 foot-pounds energy. The cartridge length of the 220 Swift Ammo is 2.680 inches, leaving enough room for standard short-action magazines. In addition, with its powder capacity, today’s longer high B.C. bullets are an excellent choice for increasing its versatility. With the 220 Swift Ammo, you can achieve muzzle velocities as high as 3,350 fps with a 75-grain bullet. It is also famous for its precisions and offers users long-range performance and minimal wind deflection. Besides its use for long-range rodent control work, it is also ideal as a long-range coyote cartridge. In states where .22 calibers are legal for hunting big games, the 220 Swift Ammo is a proven killer of mule deer, pronghorn, and even whitetails. It is an excellent choice for ringing steel at a distance; all you have to do is pace yourself.

A short burst to fame and an equally speedy staunching of that story of success is the fate of the .225 Winchester. Taking its design from the .219 Zipper, the .225 Win was created to be a fitting replacement for the .220 Swift, and it was a success that was, unfortunately, not long-lasting. When the Winchester Arms Company introduced the .225 Winchester in 1964, it soon became the go-to for long-range varmint shooting. The cartridge had three default factory loads; a 50 grain, a 55 grain, and a 60 grain, with the 50 grain being capable of traveling at 3800 fps, and the 55 grain exiting at 3600 fps. With its modern straight-tapered design, the .225 Win offers long-range, flat-shooting varmint and small game hunting with impressive accuracy. Providing the impressive performance of the .220 Swift without its destructive tendencies to the barrel, this cartridge overtook previous varmint shooters. It was also able to keep a 1-inch difference above and below the aiming point over a 100-yard distance. The only rifles that chambered this cartridge were turn-bolts or brake actions, specifically the model 70, model 670, and the Savage 340. This was a limiting factor, however, because had the rifle been chambered in more rifles, it would have held on to its fame for a while longer than it had. In just a little over a year, the hot fledgling was totally eclipsed by another, the .22-250 Remington, when the older wild-cat cartridge became commercially produced and chambered in the Browning High Powered Rifle and model 700. The difference wasn’t in the performance, as both were identical in that regard, but in the ability to discern the market. In 1971, Winchester ceased production of the .225.

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