28 Gauge vs .410 Bore

28 Gauge vs .410 Bore

Put handguns head to head to compare size, weight, capacity, and more

28 Gauge

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MSRP: $162.99

New Price: $162.99

Used Price: $130.392

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$162.99

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.410 Bore

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MSRP: $10.05

New Price: $10.05

Used Price: $8.04

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$10.05

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28 Gauge
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.410 Bore
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Summary

Specifications

Details

Model
28 Gauge
.410 Bore
Q & A
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Problems
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Deals

Gun Descriptions

28 Gauge

28 Gauge Ammo About The 28 Gauge Ammo was introduced in 1903 and ever since has proven to be quite helpful on upland game hunting and clay target shooting. The 28 Gauge Ammo has become extremely popular in recent times because of the lightweight guns. These bullets typically have a soft recoil, create a clear pattern, and allow the hunter to aim like a dream. All the 28 Gauge Ammo variants are 2 3/4 inches in length. Because the 28 Gauge Ammo isn't widely available in ammunition stores, it would be a good idea to stack up on this bullet if you are a fan and get the chance. Many hunters choose the 28 Gauge Ammo for lengthy hunting trips because of the lightweight and fast handling when hunting in the dense cover of the wild. Whether your purpose is to go for some upland hunting or skeet target shooting, the 28 Gauge Ammo will make the perfect companion for the journey. Uses If you love hunting upland birds from a reasonably long distance or you want to show off your skeet shooting skills, then the 28 Gauge Ammo should be your choice. Low recoil allows you to take precise aim and shot, while the long effective range lets you take shots from a distance. Pheasants, turkeys, roosters, and other similar animals are easy game for the 28 Gauge Ammo.

.410 Bore

410 bore Ammo About The .410 bore Ammo is considered one of the smallest caliber used for shotgun shells. The .410 bore Ammo was designed and manufactured in 1874 in the United Kingdom. The .410 bore Ammo became popular around 1900, and at that time, it was recommended to be used as naturalists, garden guns, and walking stick guns. While the .410 bore Ammo was inferior to 12-gauge shotgun Ammo for defensive use, many companies market defensive guns chambered in the .410 bore Ammo. The small size of this bullet makes it popular for use in small firearms that are carried for emergencies and mostly are guns of different combinations. The similarities between the .410 bore Ammo, and the .45 Colt Ammo allowed this cartridge's unusual applications. The .410 bore Ammo has an overall length of 2″, 2+1/2″, 3″, and the bullet diameter measures 10.4mm [slug]. The lightest variant of the .410 bore Ammo can travel at a velocity of 1,780 feet per second while creating an energy level of 1,043.1 J. Manufacturer Eley Brothers designed and produced the .410 bore Ammo, and the shell is still manufactured today. Uses The .410 bore Ammo is loaded with shotshells that a most suited for small game hunting and pest control, making it a good choice for garden hunting. People still use it for self-defense.

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