.380 Auto (9mm Browning Short) vs 10 mm

.380 Auto (9mm Browning Short) vs 10 mm

Put handguns head to head to compare size, weight, capacity, and more

.380 Auto (9mm Browning Short)

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MSRP: $19.99

New Price: $19.99

Used Price: $15.992

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10 mm

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MSRP: $21.59

New Price: $21.59

Used Price: $17.272

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.380 Auto (9mm Browning Short)
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10 mm
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Summary

Specifications

Details

Model
.380 Auto (9mm Browning Short)
10 mm
Q & A
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Problems
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Gun Descriptions

.380 Auto (9mm Browning Short)

About The .380 ACP Ammo is a rimless, straight walled cartridge designed for pistols introduced in the year of 1908. Ever since it was released into the market, it has been very popular in the self-defense department and has been widely used in numerous handguns. The .380 ACP Ammo is considered a misnomer since it doesn't strictly conform to cartridge naming conventions that are named against the bullet's diameter. Using the standard naming process, the .380 ACP Ammo should be named .355 ACP Ammo since it uses a cartridge .355 in diameter. The .380 ACP Ammo, because of its low blow-thrust, delivered a soft recoil to the shooter. The overall length of the .380 ACP Ammo is 25mm, while the bullet diameter measures 9mm. The 45-grain variant of the .380 ACP Ammo can travel at a velocity of 1,835 feet per second while creating an energy level of 337 ft.lbf.  Manufacturer John Browning designed the .380 ACP Ammo in 1908, and Colt's Manufacturing Company manufactured it in the same year.  Uses The .380 ACP Ammo has experienced a wide array of uses over the years. At least FIVE European nations picked it up as their standard pistol ammo before World War II. The .380 ACP Ammo is light and compact and delivers a short-ranged shot, creating less stopping power. The .380 ACP Ammo remains a popular cartridge for self-defense purposes. 

10 mm

About The .10mm Auto Ammo is a powerful semi-automatic cartridge for pistols designed and introduced to the markets in 1983. Although being selected by the FBI in 1989, it was decommissioned because of the heavy recoil, which made the cartridge unsuitable for training average agents and police officers. Also, the chamber of the pistols for the .10mm Auto Ammo was too large for individuals with small hands. A former cartridge design was powered up, which resulted in a very powerful bullet that can retain a flat trajectory and high energy of a magnum cartridge for revolvers in a short, versatile rimless bullet for a semi-automatic pistol. The .10mm Auto Ammo produces a slightly higher energy level than the .357 Magnum Ammo at the maximum potential. The overall length of the .10mm Auto Ammo is 32mm, and the bullet diameter is 10.17mm. The 155-grain bullet variant of the .10mm Auto Ammo can travel at a velocity of 1,500 feet per second and creates an energy level of 775 ft.lbf.  Manufacturer The .10mm Auto Ammo was first designed and developed by United States Marine Jeff Cooper in 1983.  Uses The .10mm Auto Ammo has three main uses. Hunting, defense, and tactical purposes. This cartridge is widely used for white-tailed deer hunting. The FBI and many law enforcement in the US still use the .10mm Auto Ammo for their operations. 

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