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.45-70 Government VS .375 Winchester

Head to Head Comparison

.45-70 Government

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.375 Winchester

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MSRP:

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Gun Specifications

Specifications

.45-70 Government

.375 Winchester

Height

2.11

0.00

Average FPS

1680

2200

Average Grain

363

200

Average Energy

2274

Recoil

2.43

0.00

Ballistic Coefficient

265.60

215.00

Gun Stats

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.45-70 Government

.375 Winchester

Gun Descriptions

About The .45-70 Government Ammo was designed and developed in 1873. The cartridge was created to replace the stopgap .50-70 Government Ammo. The .45-70 Government Ammo has the minimum accuracy of 4-inch drop at 100 yards, but the slow and heavy bullet in longer ranges would have a rainbow trajectory. Still, skilled shooters can easily hit targets with ease using the .45-70 Government Ammo. This cartridge was even used in several Gatling gun models, especially on US Navy warships in the 1880s and 1890s. The .45-70 Government Ammo is s super hit amongst the sportsmen, and that's the main reason this bullet is still alive today. The overall length of the .45-70 Government Ammo is 53.5mm, while the bullet diameter measures 11.6mm. One variant of the .45-70 Government Ammo is loaded with 300-grain that can travel at a velocity of 2,275 feet per second and produce an energy level of 3,449 ft.lbf.  Manufacturer To fill out the gap left by the 50.70 Government Ammo, the US Army's Springfield Armory designed and developed the .45-70 Government Ammo. Uses The traditional 405-grain variant of the .45-70 Government ammo can take down any North American big game species within its effective range. Thanks to its low velocity, the .45-70 Government Ammo doesn't destroy the edible meat on the delicate game like deer. The .45-70 Government Ammo holds the potential of taking down the big five African game in the range of 1,000 yards. 

The.375 Winchester is a modernized version of the.38-55 Winchester, which was first introduced in 1884 as a black powder cartridge. In 1978, the.375 Winchester cartridge and the Winchester Model 94 "Big Bore" lever-action rifle were launched. It was lauded at the time of its release as a cartridge capable of firing far larger bullets than the.30-30 Win. and in a rifle that weighed only 6.5 pounds. It was designed by U.S gunmaker Charles H Ballard to be a modern take on Winchester's much older ammo variants. Only Winchester produces a.375 loadings, which is advertised as a 200-grain flat nose Powerpoint bullet that shoots at a realistic 2100fps. The Powerpoint bullet breaks 1800fps at just 80 yards from this velocity, beyond which this bullet design struggles to expand. It is feasible to outperform factory loads by up to 100fps when using manual loads. The 375 Winchester produces muzzle velocities that are not as high as some of the more recent additions, including factory and hand loads. It can be a slow killer if shot placement isn't perfect. It's worth noting that the cartridge is designed to extend down to impact velocities of 1600fps. The.375" barrel is very broad, and the cartridge's hefty bullets are capable of producing relatively deep penetration. The.375 is able to deliver consistent results by combining a large bullet diameter with hefty flat pointed bullets. If you are looking to be hunting white-tailed deer in the timber, then the 375 Winchester is a good choice.

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