.50 BMG vs .50 Beowulf

.50 BMG vs .50 Beowulf

Put handguns head to head to compare size, weight, capacity, and more

.50 BMG

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MSRP: $59.39

New Price: $59.39

Used Price: $47.512

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.50 Beowulf

Rank: 0
Guncritic Certified 50%

MSRP: $59.39

New Price: $59.39

Used Price: $47.512

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.50 BMG
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.50 Beowulf
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Summary

Specifications

Details

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.50 BMG
.50 Beowulf
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Gun Descriptions

.50 BMG

The 50 Browning Machine Gun, sometimes known as the 50 BMG, is a 50 in (12.7 mm) caliber cartridge that was created for the M2 Browning heavy machine gun in the late 1910s and entered formal service in 1921. The machine gun was initially produced during World War I, and despite being cumbersome, the tank began to find its place on the battlefield—it was also resistant to most rifle and artillery shots. The 50 BMG cartridge has a 290-gram capacity (19 g). The round is a scaled-up version of the 30-06 Springfield, but it has a case wall with a long taper to make feeding and extraction easier in different guns. This cartridge's rifling twist rate is 1 in 15 in (380 mm), with eight lands and grooves. The 50 Browning Machine Gun is employed in anti-materiel rifles in addition to the M2 Browning heavy machine gun. There is a wide range of ammunition available, and match grade ammunition has boosted the use of 50 caliber rifles by allowing for more precise firing than lesser quality rounds. During WWII, the 50 BMG was principally utilized for anti-aircraft duties in the M2 Browning machine gun, both in its "light barrel" aircraft mount form and the "heavy barrel" (HB) version on ground vehicles. Depending on the powder and bullet type, as well as the weapon from which it is shot, the 50 BMG round may create between 10,000 and 15,000 foot-pounds force (14,000 and 20,000 J). The 50 BMG's trajectory suffers less "drift" from cross-winds than smaller and lighter calibers due to the high ballistic coefficient of the bullet, making it an excellent option for high-powered sniper rifles.

.50 Beowulf

Designed by Bill Alexander in 2001, the .50 Beowulf ammo was named after the legend, Beowulf who killed a powerful monster. You can say that in our modern times, the. 50 Beowulf ammo is a metaphor for the strong fighter of old, its strength able to knock down any ‘monster’ like a black bear with a single shot. In appearance, the .50 Beowulf is a fat, big bore, straight-walled cartridge that can give a 1 to 1.5 inches group with a .50 Action Express parent case. It fixes an actual .500 bullet diameter of 12.7mm, a neck diameter of 13.3mm, a base diameter of 13.6mm, and a case length of 42mm, giving it a total of 54.0mm. The .50 Beowulf ammo has a heavy rebate rim with low velocity, mainly designed for AR-15 automatic rifles to function effectively at a short to medium range of 100 yards. Presently, the 50 Beowulf ammo is used for both sporting and hunting purposes and has made a good name, mainly in North America, where the hunters have been able to track down and shoot big game like moose, deer, and black bears quickly. 50 Beowulf ammo is designed to have no ejection port cover. A 300 grained bullet (weighing 19 grams) can cover 1,870 feet per second. A 325grained shell (weighing 21 grams) moves 1.800 feet per second. A 335 grained bullet (weighing 22 grams) covers 1,771 feet per second. A 335( Rainier Plated HP Alexander) grained bullet (weighing 22 grams) covers 1900 feet per second, and a 400 grained shell (weighing 26 grams) moves 1,800 feet per second. Because of its size and model, the .50 Beowulf isn't designed for accuracy and long-distance. However, within an estimated 100 yards, you're guaranteed a clean shot that can knock your target at once.

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