7x57mm Mauser vs 7x57R

7x57mm Mauser vs 7x57R

Put handguns head to head to compare size, weight, capacity, and more

7x57mm Mauser

Rank: 0
Guncritic Certified 50%

MSRP: $699.89

New Price: $699.89

Used Price: $559.912

Featured Deal

Guns.com

$699.89

See deal
vs

7x57R

Rank: 0
Guncritic Certified 50%

MSRP: $699.89

New Price: $699.89

Used Price: $559.912

Featured Deal

Guns.com

$699.89

See deal
vs
7x57mm Mauser
vs
7x57R
vs

Summary

Specifications

Details

Model
7x57mm Mauser
7x57R
Q & A
N/A
N/A
Problems
N/A
N/A

Deals

Gun Descriptions

7x57mm Mauser

The 7x57mm Mauser was designed in 1893 by Paul Mauser and is also known as the 7mm Spanish Mauser, .275 Rigby, along with 7mm Mauser. The case is an original design with a rimless, bottleneck type case that fits a .285 inch bullet on a .325 inch neck with a case length of 2.244 inches and overall length of 3.071 inches. It has a large rifle primer with a 1:8.66 twist. The ballistic performance for the 7.57 Mauser based off three grain types for muzzle velocity are 3,000 ft/s (139 gr), 2,600 ft/s (162 gr), 2,500 ft/s (173 gr RWS HMK), and 2,300 ft/s (173 gr Military load). The 7x57 Mauser has become a popular hunting rifle for shooters, and has been used by militaries such as the Spanish government. The 7x57 Mauser has a almost flat trajectory along with a moderate recoil when fired. In addition it has good wound penetration on game up to the size of an elephant, which has been noted by such hunters as Walter Bell. Bell was famous for his African Safari hunting expeditions during the early 1900's, but later caliber rounds have replaced big game hunting cartridges such as the 7x57 Mauser. Now it used on game in North America up to the size of moose in most cases.

7x57R

The 7x57R, a rimmed version of the 7x57mm, was introduced on the heels of the 7x57mm Mauser cartridge. The rim allowed the cartridge to be fired from the popular break action rifles used by hunters in the early 1900s. Mauser and the Spanish military had done extensive testing to develop and field the cartridge in the Model 1893 bolt action rifle. This made the 7x57R easy to market to hunters, since the cartridge was already established as accurate and effective. The 7x57R was not loaded to the same pressures as its predecessor, yet the cartridge was highly successful in the hunting world. Bullet trajectory is mostly flat, which makes it a good choice for hunting game on the plains. Hunters also favored the 7x57R for its knock-down power, which resulted from the moderately heavy bullet with high sectional density. The 7x57R possesses one final performance factor – superior penetration as a result of the long bullet shape and fast twist rate. Found all in one cartridge, these characteristics make it effective for hunting large game. Ballistic values for the 7x57R are excellent, with bullets weighing between 120 grains and 175 grains. The most common bullet configurations are Soft Point and FMJ, and muzzle velocities range between 2,200 and 2,900 feet per second. The Norma company produces the most ammunition in this cartridge, as none of the other major manufacturers produce this caliber. Norma makes their own bullets for the 7x57R, but also uses bullets made by Hornady and Nosler. Hunters have used the 7x75R to take animals as diverse as the mighty elephant and the roe deer. 7x57R ammo is held in high regard because of its power and versatility, allowing it to serve North American hunters well in their pursuit of any medium- to large-sized game.

Suggested Comparisons

7x57mm Mauser
.275 Rigby

7x57mm Mauser

vs

.275 Rigby

vs
.308 Winchester (7.62mm NATO)
7x57R

.308 Winchester (7.62mm NATO)

vs

7x57R

vs